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Suspended sentence for woman breeching lifetime ban on owning animals

Friday, April 7th, 2017 4:26pm

A Stoke-on-Trent woman has been ​given a suspended prison sentence for breaking a ban on keeping animals, after she was found to own two cats - one of which needed a leg amputating.

 

The RSPCA was contacted in November 2016 by a local police officer who had seen cats at Aisha Farooq’s home address, despite being convicted of animal welfare offences in 2014 and receiving a lifetime disqualification order on owning animals.

On Monday (3 April), Aisha Farooq, of Maple Close, pleaded guilty to two offences at North Staffordshire Justice Centre - being in breach of the disqualification order imposed on her in February 2014, and for failing to meet the needs of one of the cats by failing to investigate the cause of an injury.

For breaching the ban, magistrates gave her an eight-week prison sentence, suspended for 12 months​.

Magistrates also imposed on her a 12-week prison sentence, also ​suspended for 12 months, for failing to meet the needs of the cat with the injury.

Farooq was also ordered to pay £300 in costs.

Her lifetime disqualification order still remains in place.


Two cats were removed from Farooq’s property

RSPCA inspector Charlotte Melvin said: “There were two cats inside the property - a kitten named Whiskers and an adult cat named JJ, who had a terrible injury and was walking with an abnormal limp.

“After examination by a vet, it emerged that JJ had a fractured hip which should have been examined by a vet much earlier. As a result of this, she had to have a leg amputated.

“This could have all been avoided if the disqualification order had not been breached in the first place. The courts hand out disqualification orders for a reason - to protect animals from suffering and neglect at the hands of people who have been convicted of doing so.

“Thankfully, both cats which were removed from Farooq’s property have been rehomed and are now living lovely new lives.

“It is important to reiterate to the public that we rely on them to tell us if someone has breached a ban. We depend on the public to be our eyes and ears and we take breaches of bans very seriously - as do the courts.”

 

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